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Slavery and Race - November 1997 - Volume 3, Number 11
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Slavery and Race - November 1997 - Volume 3, Number 11
Slavery and Race

Original Source - National Vanguard Magazine http://www.natvan.com
November 1997 - Volume 3, Number 11

by Dr. William Pierce


I have before me a news story written by a correspondent for the London Daily Telegraph. It's a story about the flourishing child-slavery business in West Africa: in countries like Nigeria, Togo, Benin, and Gabon. Businessmen in the coastal cities send buyers into the interior with buses, where they collect surplus children, in the seven- to 15-year-old age range, and bring them back in groups of 50 to 100 -- in other words, a bus load -- to the slave markets on the coast. Typically the buyers pay parents anywhere from 10 to 30 dollars per child. In some areas, they simply bribe local officials to look the other way and kidnap the children.

Once in the coastal cities, the children are housed in large, supermarket-style buildings where shoppers can stroll through, select the children they want to buy, and pay for their merchandise at the door as they leave. Some of the purchasers send the children out on the streets to work as prostitutes. Others use them as house servants or as factory workers.

This is not a small-time thing or an occasional thing. This is a thriving business involving thousands of children bought and sold every year in dozens of slave markets in West African cities, in the region which used to be known as the "slave coast," because That's where the slave dealers, during the 18th and early 19th centuries, would buy ship loads of slaves to take to the West Indies and the Americas for plantation work. After slavery was outlawed in Europe and America, it continued as an ongoing institution in Africa, just as it had for countless centuries before White men began buying African slaves.


The only reason Europeans and White Americans ever hear anything about this ongoing African slave trade is that there are a few tender-hearted White groups, such as Amnesty International and Anti-Slavery International, whose sensibilities are offended by this sort of thing. These groups try to arouse public opinion in America and Europe against slavery. They also work through politicians, trying to persuade them to put anti-slavery amendments into aid agreements with African countries. As a result of such aid-agreement amendments most African countries recently have gone through the motions of enacting legislation outlawing slavery. All this means in practice is that the slave dealers must pay bribes to the politicians or the police in order to avoid interference with their business.

Now, the news story I mentioned appeared because the London-based group Anti-Slavery International has just released a report detailing the latest facts and figures for child slavery in West Africa. Do you wonder why you Don't see more news about the slave trade? Do you wonder why the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, and the major television news networks have virtually nothing to say about it? Can you imagine the outrage you would see in these controlled media, day after day and week after week, if White people were behind this trade in Black children?


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